Two notes — one sad, the other happy

We say goodbye to another of the 20th century’s greatest children’s book authors, Else Holmelund Minarik–writer of (among other books) the Little Bear series, with pictures by Maurice Sendak–who died on Thursday at age 91. Her poetic prose is much imitated but rarely if ever outmatched. Lee Bennett Hopkins, who knew Else, has a nice tribute post on his journal today.

******

And on a lighter note, from PACYA member Carol-Ann Hoyte in Montreal, Canada, who recently returned from a visit to the UK:

So you think you can write poetry? 

Under the direction of the UK poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy, the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University is launching the third edition of the Manchester Poetry Prize — a major international literary competition celebrating excellence in creative writing. 

A cash prize of 10,000 British pounds will be awarded to the writer of the best poems submitted.

This international competition is open to emerging and established writers aged 16 and up.

All entrants are asked to submit a portfolio of three to five poems (total maximum length: 120 lines). The poems can be on any subject, and written in any style or form, but must be new work, not previously published, or submitted for consideration elsewhere during this competition.

The submission deadline: August 31, 2012

Visit www.manchesterwritingcompetition.co.uk/poetry/ for more details and to enter online or to download a printable entry form.
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2 thoughts on “Two notes — one sad, the other happy

  1. When 1st graders were asked to chose soimhteng to present at their PTA program, most children in my daughter’s class chose nursery rhymes or simple songs. My daughter recited The Spider and the Fly, a lengthy poem by Mary Howitt. It is only one of the dozens that her grandfather quoted from memory so often that she also had it memorized. Interestingly, his repertoire of poems is always accompanied by appropriate application to children’s lives and the grandchildren have learned both the poems and their meanings.

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